Beerseba Independent Chapel, Welshpool-Powys, urbex, abandoned
Beerseba Welsh Independent Chapel, Welshpool
Beerseba Independent Chapel, Foel, Welshpool-Powys
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Beerseba Independent Chapel, Foel, Welshpool-Powys
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Beerseba Independent Chapel, Foel, Welshpool-Powys
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Beerseba Independent Chapel, Foel, Welshpool-Powys
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Beerseba Independent Chapel, Foel, Welshpool-Powys
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Beerseba Independent Chapel, Foel, Welshpool-Powys
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Beerseba Independent Chapel, Foel, Welshpool-Powys
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Beerseba Independent Chapel, Foel, Welshpool-Powys
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Beerseba Independent Chapel, Foel, Welshpool-Powys
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Beerseba Independent Chapel, Foel, Welshpool-Powys
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Beerseba Independent Chapel, Foel, Welshpool-Powys
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Beerseba Independent Chapel, Foel, Welshpool-Powys
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Beerseba Independent Chapel, Foel, Welshpool-Powys
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Beerseba Independent Chapel, Foel, Welshpool-Powys
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Beerseba Independent Chapel, Foel, Welshpool-Powys
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Beerseba Independent Chapel, Foel, Welshpool-Powys
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Beerseba Independent Chapel, Foel, Welshpool-Powys
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Beerseba Independent Chapel, Foel, Welshpool-Powys
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Beerseba Independent Chapel, Foel, Welshpool-Powys
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Beerseba Independent Chapel, Foel, Welshpool-Powys
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Visited in 2015, this tiny chapel is just another example of the plethora of abandoned and derelict chapels scattered across wales. Most of these chapels date back to the beginning of the 1800s when non-conformist chapels began to become the dominant place of worship fuelled by the ever increasing population, in parallel with the growth of the industrial revolution.

Some have been demolished, some have been renovated - usually into domestic dwellings. Some, however, stand where they were origionally built and have become forgotten relics of Wale's ecclesiastical past and often in a state of decay.

This chapel was built in 1805 and subsequently knocked down and rebuilt in 1843 with enough room to house 100 parishioners. This later chapel was built in the Vernacular style with a long-wall entry plan and small pane flat-headed windows. In 2002 this chapel had fallen into the same fate as so many other chapels and closed for good as a place of worship, probably due to the decline in congregational numbers.

Its name is apparently derived from the ancient city of Beersheba in the biblical Holy Land.

Inside the chapel, the structure has succumbed to the elements and the inevitable signs of decay are everywhere. Ivy has creeped in - as it usually does - into the interior, adding a nice touch to the interior design. Assorted paraphernalia is still to be found lying around such as hymn books and children's exercise books from sunday school and even a vintage bottle of furnitre polish!

The pews are still in place as is the early 19th century organ made by W. Bell & Co.

Attached to the chapel is the clergy house which would have been the residence of the serving minister at that time. When I visited, the only remaining resident was a long-deceased sheep, its bones lay scattered across the dusty floor.

At the time of writing this, there doesn't appear to be any plans to renovate this former chapel so it will remain abandoned and unloved.