Villa Steen

Quite how this house has got into such a poor state is mystifying and no one seems to want it, or be bothered enough to secure it and keep it safe.

 

Earlier in the day we met some Belgium explorers at Manor of the Bride and they kindly tipped us off about this house [Thanks Hettie & Jo!]. Dodging the factory workers behind the house we found a way in and spent a couple of hours inside here. Once again, I had to borrow a camera having destroyed my D800 earlier in the trip so whilst my companion took her photographs I had a good root around before getting to borrow her camera and dash around in 30 minutes to get my shots! Now i always travel with 2 camera bodies on trips, just in case!

 

The house belonged to the station master of the nearby train station, in fact the house was so close to the station it was unnerving having so may people milling around outside. One quickly becomes desensitised to it all though and lost in the confines and contents of the location.

The house itself is pure Art Deco. A pure monument to that period. Straight lines, right angles were everywhere, nothing had curves, just pure geometrical form. The fireplaces, clocks, statues and furniture all etched into a theme, even the bathroom was pure Art Deco. I imagine the bar of soap which was once there was probably the same! 

 

In terms of contemporary design, the house had it in abundance. Decay had extensively set in lending a strange mashed effect to the walls which dominated the surroundings as clocks and crucifixes remained in place as time had stood still. Wedding photos were still in place, the bride and groom nowhere to be seen, probably for many years.

 

Much paperwork relating to trains and railway systems in general was still scattered around along with books and magazines all relating to the rail industry.

 

A quite beautiful house which must have looked quite something in its day. Art Deco & Decay. Quite a combination.