urbex photography
The Hoarder's Home.
Worcestershire

A curious little house. Hidden from a busy main road by a mini amazon jungle, unless you knew what was behind the green shield protecting it from the outside world you'd never know it was even there. Approached from the rear to avoid the couple of neighbours nearby [who actually turned out to be helpful in their knowledge of the house] it was a case of using my tripod to beat back the nettles and brambles just to make a kind of tunnel in order to get to the house such was the denseness of the foliage.

Upon finally seeing the house once i'd shaken myself of insects and foliage it was easy to see why it was hidden so easy. The house was tiny. Two rooms on each floor and no bathroom that I could see. Obviously there would have been a bathroom but where it was I have no idea! 

 

The overgrown gardens were full of items from the house. Bags upon bags of discarded items. Collections of videos and books wrapped away in bin liners, crockery, electrical items, all strewn around this mini jungle. I wondered how it was possible that all the items in the gardens could possibly fit inside this tiny house along with the mass of items still left inside the house?

Back to the gardens, possibly the strangest site were the - yes I counted - 25 vintage cars wrapped in branches, rusting and decaying, becoming homes to all manner of insects and birds and display units to broken vintage viseo players and record players [much to my delight!]. An old Ford Capri decaying next to an old Rover in turn decaying next to a marvelous vintage vauxhall Viva. What looked like a Hillman Imp buried beneath branches, windows smashed and badges removed a glorious throwback to yesteryear. I am told there were originally over 50 vintage cars on this site making it one impressive collection of cars by anyone's standards!

 

So who lived here? From chatting with the neighbour, it hadn't been vacant for that long, maybe 4-5 years. The last person to live here being an elderley man who had lived here all his life and lived alone, unmarried after the passing of his parents. As is typical of a lot of these houses, it seems the man was a reclusive type keeping himsielf to himself whilst building up masses of items to hoard in his home. 

Inside the house, photography in the downstairs rooms was nearly impossible with a tripod such was the ammount of discarded items on the floors. I managed to dig 3 holes opposite the fireplace in order to place my tripod down. Upstairs was a little easier however. Old bottles, fashion magazines form the 1950's probably belonging to the mother. Books, letters, photographs amongst all manner of items left behind. 

I spent round 3 hours inside and then left. Warnings of giant rats lurking in the darkest corners of the house had proved unfounded thankfully! A remarkable little house with an incredible ammount of junk left inside, I guess some people just can't let go of anything they buy.